Cotswold Way - Winchcombe

The village of Winchcombe should really have become a city and centre of its own shire but history has passed it by. In Saxon times it was the royal seat of the Hwicce tribe, part of the kingdom of Mercia, and it is from them that it takes it's name (Hwicce-Combe or valley of the Hwicce). It became, together with Gloucester and Worcester, a fortified borough with banks and ditches to defend against the Danes. Like those cities it had a Benedictine monastery which was a centre of pilgrimage and became one of the largest landowners in the Cotswolds. Its huge flocks of sheep that brought great wealth and it's castle giving it strategic importance Winchcombe seemed to have everything going for it but, after the Reformation, it slipped gently into rural obscurity. Fortunately for us this has left a rich legacy of interesting buildings. The most important are Sudeley Castle and the large church, saved for the town at the Dissolution of the Monasteries, which has a wonderful collection of grotesques.  Many shops, tea rooms, restaurant, pubs and a good selection of accommodation.

 
 

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The Cotswold Way

The Cotswold Way is a long distance walking trail that spans over 102 miles (164km) of beautiful English countryside. With more than 20 stops, it passes through many picturesque villages and runs close to a significant number of historical sites such as Hailes Abbey, Sudeley Castle and the Neolithic Burial Chamber at Belas Knap. In 2007, it was formally recognized as a National Trail and has long been considered as an essentially English experience.


news

E Bayley

A quick line to thank you, Steve and Greg for such an efficient service in transferring our bags during the first 4 days of walking the Cotswold Way last week.

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K & D Spence

You gave us a great service on our recent trip along the Cotswold Way! We want to thank you most warmly for the efficient and helpful way you accomodated our alterations into the original booking for Carry...

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